1. Dining With Kids: How To Survive A Restaurant With Young Children

    Many families shy away from taking young children to restaurants to eat, but exposing young kids to dining out can be a great way to teach them etiquette, social skills, and patience. As they get older, your child will know better how to behave in a restaurant, and taking them out will be much easier after they’ve had some practice. At Child's World Academy, our daycare teachers help children de…Read More

  2. 10 Household Chores That Young Children Can Do By Themselves

    Chores help kids to build confidence and a sense of responsibility during the stages of early childhood development. If you have a younger child, it can be difficult to think of chores that they can actually accomplish without your constant intervention. At Child's World Academy, our daycare teachers believe it is important to give young children chores that are easy to handle yet give them a sens…Read More

  3. 8 Warm Weather Tips for Keeping Kids Safe in the Summertime

    As the warmer weather approaches, your family is likely looking forward to hikes, beach trips, and picnics in the park. Remember to make your outdoor activities safe activities by taking a few important safety precautions that are necessary when the temperature heats up and the sun comes out. Our daycare teachers at Child's World Academy put this list of tips together to help you protect your litt…Read More

  4. Preparing Young Children for a Family Dog

    At some point during their childhood, most kids will ask for a dog. If you love dogs and have been waiting to get one, prepare your children thoroughly before you do. Teach your children about the different responsibilities they’ll have once you adopt a dog, and talk to them about some of the basics of respecting, teaching, and training dogs. This will help your family stay on the same page when…Read More

  5. Amblyopia: A Common, But Treatable, Childhood Vision Problem

    The most common vision problem affecting young children is amblyopia, which affects 3% of children under the age of eight. It occurs when the brain sends signals to one eye, and allows neural pathways to develop in connection to that eye, but not to the other eye. This condition is very treatable, but effective treatment relies on early detection, and children are not always able to communicate to…Read More